A Bird’s Eye View at Point Dume, Malibu

An extreme heat warning was issued for Ojai yesterday.  Luckily for me,  Matthew had invited me to head to Malibu and explore Point Dume State Beach, a healthy ecosystem on the bluffs that overlook the shore.

“Two miles of scenic trails through grasslands, coastal bluff scrub, and southern foredune areas allow visitors to view an island of delicate biological integrity….The Native Californian Chumash tribe inhabited this coastline for thousands of years and used this area as a sacred space….The incredible vistas here at the point provide an opportunity to view sea lions, harbor seals and dolphins in the surf only a few dozen feet away.” (1)

Westward Beach

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Point Dume is a coastal terrace formation dating from the Pleistocene age, 104,000-230,000 years ago. (2)  The tip is the western edge of the Santa Monica Fault, which runs 40 km to the east. (3)  At 150 feet and rising by 1/1,000 ft per year, the bluffs tower over the sea life playing below, allowing adventurous humans the opportunity to walk along the summit and gaze down on soaring pelicans and barking sea lions. (4)

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

The viewing platform is said to be wheelchair-accessible on the state parks website.  There is a parking lot at the top of the bluffs, a dirt path, and then a wooden path that leads to the platform.

“Some disabled parking is available along Cliffside Drive, adjacent the bluff-top park area. For viewing platform access, negotiating a slight grade will be necessary.” (5)

Sea lions bathing in the sun

We found beautiful igneous rocks which are remnants of basaltic lava from an ancient volcano. (6)   The green strata are formed by melted light green sandstone. (7)

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Sources:

(1) http://www.parks.ca.gov/pages/623/files/PtDumeBrochure.pdf

(2)http://gmw.consrv.ca.gov/shmp/download/evalrpt/poid_eval.pdf

(3) http://www.tectonics.caltech.edu/outreach/local/dume.html

(4) http://www.malibugeology.com/rising.html

(5) http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=623

(6) http://www.tectonics.caltech.edu/outreach/local/

(7) http://aapgbull.geoscienceworld.org/content/43/1/222.abstract

Windswept Sandstone in the Sespe Wilderness, Ojai

The Los Padres Forest behind Ojai is a playground for outdoor enthusiasts.  Nestled like a jewel in the mountains is the Sespe Wilderness, about 20 minutes north of Ojai up Hwy 33 at the end of Rose Valley Road.

“Sespe Wilderness provides ample evidence of past violent geological upthrusts. The landscape is bleak and jagged, and if you climb high enough, you’ll find pine trees growing at odd angles on boulder-swept hillsides.” – wilderness.net

My car, “Sally”, in view of the Piedra Blanca formations

Joining me was Matthew, my agreeable new compañero for hiking, who warded off mountain lions with his stately presence, or so I imagined.  Matthew is new to this area of California; he grew up in various places in the Western United States and is eager to practice his photography skills at all the intriguing spots to be found.   While we were on this excursion, little Phoebe played at preschool for the day, giving me the unusual opportunity to hike a little farther and relax a little longer than I normally would.

Our destination was the Piedra Blanca formations.  To get to this spot, we followed Rose Valley Road to its end.  At the far point of the parking lot is the trailhead.  There are markers to point the way left at the first T-intersection of the path and right at the Y-intersection.  The path to the formations took us 30 minutes and was easy to moderately difficult.

When we arrived, we were treated to a cool, brisk wind that swept through the boulders and across the gritty sandstone.  The impressive formations of this sediment are approximately 20 million years old from the Miocene epoch.  You can see a neat graph from the U.S. Geological Survey of the types and ages of the sediment along the San Andreas fault here.

Photo credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo credit: Matthew Phelps