Hsi Lai Temple, Hacienda Heights

Hsi Lai Temple feels like an oasis in the middle of white-hot urban sprawl of Southern California.  The dry “Santa Ana” winds were blowing at the time of our visit, adding an invigorating charge to the air.  On our way there, Matthew and I paused at Sycamore Canyon to go for a leisurely hike and listen to the dry brush speak with its rustling.  The air is usually so still in Southern California that the plants never otherwise have a voice.  It is wonderful to feel everything come alive when these winds visit every autumn.

Upon arrival, we meandered through the gardens and gazed upon the faces of statues with expressions ranging from serene to crazed and comical.  Since I lean more toward Zen Buddhism than Mahayana Buddhism (the former being more minimalistic and the latter being more ceremonial), it was peculiar for me to see a “forest of faces” in those gardens.  I was further awe-struck by the extravagance of the meditation temple, featuring three giant gold statues of the Buddha and so many tiny golden lights to entrance and humble the observer that it was easy to let go of extraneous thoughts and be still, if only for a few moments in the day.

A Bird’s Eye View at Point Dume, Malibu

An extreme heat warning was issued for Ojai yesterday.  Luckily for me,  Matthew had invited me to head to Malibu and explore Point Dume State Beach, a healthy ecosystem on the bluffs that overlook the shore.

“Two miles of scenic trails through grasslands, coastal bluff scrub, and southern foredune areas allow visitors to view an island of delicate biological integrity….The Native Californian Chumash tribe inhabited this coastline for thousands of years and used this area as a sacred space….The incredible vistas here at the point provide an opportunity to view sea lions, harbor seals and dolphins in the surf only a few dozen feet away.” (1)

Westward Beach

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Point Dume is a coastal terrace formation dating from the Pleistocene age, 104,000-230,000 years ago. (2)  The tip is the western edge of the Santa Monica Fault, which runs 40 km to the east. (3)  At 150 feet and rising by 1/1,000 ft per year, the bluffs tower over the sea life playing below, allowing adventurous humans the opportunity to walk along the summit and gaze down on soaring pelicans and barking sea lions. (4)

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

The viewing platform is said to be wheelchair-accessible on the state parks website.  There is a parking lot at the top of the bluffs, a dirt path, and then a wooden path that leads to the platform.

“Some disabled parking is available along Cliffside Drive, adjacent the bluff-top park area. For viewing platform access, negotiating a slight grade will be necessary.” (5)

Sea lions bathing in the sun

We found beautiful igneous rocks which are remnants of basaltic lava from an ancient volcano. (6)   The green strata are formed by melted light green sandstone. (7)

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Photo Credit: Matthew Phelps

Sources:

(1) http://www.parks.ca.gov/pages/623/files/PtDumeBrochure.pdf

(2)http://gmw.consrv.ca.gov/shmp/download/evalrpt/poid_eval.pdf

(3) http://www.tectonics.caltech.edu/outreach/local/dume.html

(4) http://www.malibugeology.com/rising.html

(5) http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=623

(6) http://www.tectonics.caltech.edu/outreach/local/

(7) http://aapgbull.geoscienceworld.org/content/43/1/222.abstract