Pine Mountain Buddhist Temple, Ozena Valley

One of the most lovely things about living in Southern California is enjoying the mild, sunny days of autumn.  The heat of summer has subsided and is no longer unbearable during mid-day.  The grass that covers the hills dies and turns golden and brittle to match the leaves of the maple trees.  If lightning strikes, the brush is consumed and the ashes enable wildflowers to bloom and the seed pods of some species to germinate which wouldn’t otherwise.

This beauty was well displayed on the drive up to Pine Mountain Buddhist Temple.  From Ojai, Matthew and I drove up highway 33 along the Jacinto Reyes Scenic Byway.   (See: Shadows of Sage Brush in Jacinto Reyes.)

About a mile after turning on to Lockwood Valley Road, we encountered the entrance to the temple.  I had e-mailed the two monks in residence to ask if our visit would work well for their schedule, as requested on their website, so they were anticipating our arrival.

Two friendly, mellow dogs greeted us at the car before we were welcomed by one of the monks.  We were the only visitors for the moment and received a full tour of the temple grounds.  His colleague came out of the kitchen to welcome us, saying that she was making soup for the guests who would be coming later that afternoon for a weekend retreat.

We were shown a garden with a koi pond which he said had trouble keeping koi because the herons would occasionally visit and take a snack for themselves.  I laughed and mused that the herons must have thought it kind that they had provided such a convenient spot to hunt.  The urge to anthropomorphize never ceases to provide opportunities for humor.  To dissuade the herons, they had erected a life-size decoy bird near the pond since herons are territorial.

We were also shown a green house in construction and told that it was hard to grow food in the area, including fruit trees, without an animal beating them to the harvest.  Rabbits weren’t the only culprits; coyotes love grapes, apparently, and a bear had feasted upon their apple tree, bending and breaking the branches like a broken umbrella.  Besides the trouble of growing food, the temple is quite self-sufficient through the use of well water and a solar panel system that covers all their electrical needs.